“What’s wrong with the laws of the game?” Ian Chappell Slams ‘Spirit of Cricket’ as ‘Rubbish,’ Advocates Strict Adherence to Game Laws

The fans are enjoying another World Cup. the Under-19 World Cup is taking place in South Africa. The young lads from all the cricket-playing nations are taking part in this tournament. The tournament has come to an end. After completing the group stage and the semifinal stage, the top two teams are waiting to play the final game. But some moments in this tournament raised concern over the ‘Spirit of Cricket’. Ex-Australian batsman Ian Chappell strongly dismissed the ‘Spirit of Cricket’ ideas, labeling them as “complete nonsense.”

The matter:

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Ongoing discussions surround recent controversial ‘obstructing the field’ calls, sparking concerns about players potentially straying from the ingrained respect taught in cricket. In the U19 Cricket World Cup, England’s Hamza Shaikh faced a contentious ‘Obstructing the Field’ dismissal against Zimbabwe, adding fuel to the ongoing debate. 

Meanwhile, in the Sheffield Shield, a similar spirit debate unfolded as NSW batter Chris Green was deemed not out for obstructing the field against Western Australia. These incidents fuel the broader conversation about the evolving dynamics of player conduct and adherence to traditional values in the sport. The controversies have ignited a dialogue on whether the essence of respect and fair play, integral to cricket’s ethos, is at risk of diminishing among contemporary players.

Ian Chappel’s View:

While concerns arise about bowlers and fielding teams appealing for obstructing the field, Chappell doesn’t perceive any issue with this approach. He said, “I don’t take any notice of people talking about ‘spirit of cricket’ because ‘spirit of cricket’ to me, is rubbish. What’s wrong with the laws of the game? If you play to the laws of the game, you don’t need the rest of the crap. Try another term because that’s the greatest load of bollocks ever written.”

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Later he added, “If you’re batting and it’s rolling to the stumps and you stop it with your foot, do not touch it with your hand. If you touch it with your hand, whatever happens to you, should happen. If you’re given out like the English batsman, you’re out. See you later. All this bollocks about asking the fielders. It’s bollocks.”

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The fans are enjoying another World Cup. the Under-19 World Cup is taking place in South Africa. The young lads from all the cricket-playing nations are taking part in this tournament. The tournament has come to an end. After completing the group stage and the semifinal stage, the top two teams are waiting to play the final game. But some moments in this tournament raised concern over the ‘Spirit of Cricket’. Ex-Australian batsman Ian Chappell strongly dismissed the 'Spirit of Cricket' ideas, labeling them as "complete nonsense."

The matter:

Ongoing discussions surround recent controversial 'obstructing the field' calls, sparking concerns about players potentially straying from the ingrained respect taught in cricket. In the U19 Cricket World Cup, England's Hamza Shaikh faced a contentious 'Obstructing the Field' dismissal against Zimbabwe, adding fuel to the ongoing debate. 

Meanwhile, in the Sheffield Shield, a similar spirit debate unfolded as NSW batter Chris Green was deemed not out for obstructing the field against Western Australia. These incidents fuel the broader conversation about the evolving dynamics of player conduct and adherence to traditional values in the sport. The controversies have ignited a dialogue on whether the essence of respect and fair play, integral to cricket's ethos, is at risk of diminishing among contemporary players.

Ian Chappel’s View:

While concerns arise about bowlers and fielding teams appealing for obstructing the field, Chappell doesn't perceive any issue with this approach. He said, “I don't take any notice of people talking about 'spirit of cricket' because 'spirit of cricket' to me, is rubbish. What's wrong with the laws of the game? If you play to the laws of the game, you don't need the rest of the crap. Try another term because that's the greatest load of bollocks ever written.”

Later he added, “If you're batting and it's rolling to the stumps and you stop it with your foot, do not touch it with your hand. If you touch it with your hand, whatever happens to you, should happen. If you're given out like the English batsman, you're out. See you later. All this bollocks about asking the fielders. It's bollocks.”

Stay updated with all the cricketing action, follow Cricadium on WhatsappFacebook, Twitter, and Instagram